Intergovernmental relations

Taxonomy

Code

Scope note(s)

  • Here are entered works related to relationships between the Government of the Northwest Territories and other governments, including Indigenous governments, the government of Canada, other territorial and provincial governments, and governments outside Canada.

Source note(s)

  • NWTA

Display note(s)

Hierarchical terms

Intergovernmental relations

Equivalent terms

Intergovernmental relations

  • UF Indigenous peoples -- Government relations
  • UF Federal-territorial relations
  • UF Provincial-territorial relations
  • UF Interterritorial relations
  • UF International relations

Associated terms

Intergovernmental relations

15 Authority record results for Intergovernmental relations

12 results directly related Exclude narrower terms

Metis Nation

  • Corporate body

At the founding conference of the Native Council of Canada in March, 1972, sixteen Metis from the Northwest Territories established a steering committee with the aim of forming a Metis interest group in the Northwest Territories. The Metis Association of the Northwest Territories headquarters was established in Hay River in April, 1972. The Association's membership at that time numbered 7700. After a period of financial instability, the Metis Association moved to Yellowknife in late-1973 better able to meet its administrative and program requirements established at the first annual General Assembly held earlier that year. The original focus of the Association was on self-help programs at the community level, as well as the development of leadership among northern Metis. After the move to Yellowknife, the focus shifted to establishing Metis title to land and resources, gradually aligning themselves with the Indian Brotherhood of the NWT. Programs run by the Association helped to repair homes in the Western Arctic, raise awareness of drug and alcohol issues in the communities, and as part of its cultural program, produce a history of the Metis entitled "Our Metis Heritage" in 1976. At this time, the Metis Association also managed the health claims of its members. Although not negotiating land claims directly, the Metis Association provided administrative support to the Indian Brotherhood of the NWT and some of its members sat on the Joint Dene Land Claims Negotiating Committee alongside the Indian Brotherhood (later called the Dene Nation). In 1988, the Metis Heritage Association was formed from the existing Metis Association, handling cultural affairs of the Metis of the NWT. The Metis Association of the NWT changed its name to the Metis Nation in the early 1990s. The Metis Nation closed its Yellowknife head office in the summer of 2001.

Northwest Territories. Department of the Executive (1967-2017)

  • Corporate body

The Department of the Executive was established in 1967. It was comprised of the Commissioner's Office, the Ministers' Offices and the Executive Council Secretariat that provided administrative and operational support to the department and to the Executive Council that in turn directed the administration branch of the Government of the Northwest Territories. Regional Directors coordinated government activities in each of the five administrative regions of the Northwest Territories. Executive staff, which reported to Regional Directors, were located in many communities and assisted with the coordination and dissemination of information related to government programs and services at the community level.

The Department of the Executive provided operational and administrative support to many activities and agencies including: Fire Marshal or Fire Prevention Services (1967-1971); Management Services or Internal Audit and Regulations (1969-1971); Historical Advisory Board (1970-1971); Liquor System (1970-1971); Emergency Measures or Emergency Planning and Environment Protection (1975-1977) and (1982-1983); Science Advisory Board (1976-1977); Land Claims Secretariat (1978-1980); In-Service Library (1973-1975) and (1981-1983); Geographic and Place Names (1985-1986); Security Advisor or Security (1974-1993) Office of Constitutional Development or Office of Devolution (1985-1992); Highway Transport Board/Public Utilities Board (1989-1992); Energy and Resource Development Secretariat or Energy, Mines and Resource Secretariat (1981-1989); Bureau of Statistics (1979-1994); Worker's Compensation Board (1982-1997) and the Science Institute of the Northwest Territories (1989-1994).

In a major restructuring between 1994 and 1995, the Executive Council directed that the Ministerial and Departmental Mandates and Goals of the Department of the Executive, Finance and Personnel be revised and that associated organizational changes be implemented. The Department of the Executive was reorganized and divided into three separate and distinct programs, each under the authority of a separate Minister. The three programs are: Executive Offices, the Financial Management Board Secretariat and the Ministry of Intergovernmental and Aboriginal Affairs (formerly Aboriginal Rights and Constitutional Development Secretariat).

The Executive Offices Program provides overall direction, management and coordination to the GNWT as a whole. The Department provides policy, legislative, communications and strategic advice to Cabinet and to GNWT departments. The program also provides broad direction for the territorial public service and addresses national and international issues that have cross-departmental implications. The Executive Offices reviews all departmental initiatives to ensure that they support the government’s agenda in a balanced manner and directs focus towards areas where balance is not being achieved. The Secretary to Cabinet/Deputy Minister of Executive manages the Executive Offices Program. This program is responsible for the following: the Commissioner's Office, the Ministers' Offices, the Cabinet Secretariat and the Public Utilities Board. In 2003-2004, Executive Offices Program became responsible for the another unit, the Beaufort Delta Regional Office, which was responsible for implementing Cabinet priorities and direction, coordinating GNWT program and service responsibilities in the region and transition planning at the regional level in preparation for the implementation of a final self-government agreement.

The Commissioner’s Office provides funding for the Commissioner’s operational expenses, travel and support staff and for the Commissioner’s Award Program which recognizes individuals who distinguish themselves by acts of bravery of exceptional public service.

The Ministers' Offices include the Premier's Office, Ministers' Offices, and Women's Advisory. This unit provides advice, communication and operation support to the Premier and Cabinet, six Ministers and support staff. The Women’s Advisory provides a point of contact within the territorial government on issues of concern to women and advice and support to the Minister Responsible for the Status of Women.

The programs delivered by the Cabinet Secretariat have changed throughout the years. It has included such units as Secretariat Management, Official Languages Unit, Personnel Secretariat, Division Review Secretariat, Intergovernmental Affairs, and Corporate Services, which supports all three Programs of the Department of the Executive budgetary by providing, budgetary, financial and administrative services. The Legislation and House Planning unit provides advice and support to Cabinet, departments and government agencies with respect to the development of legislation and for sessions of the Legislative Assembly. Between 1998-1999, the Regulatory Reform Secretariat was added to the Cabinet Secretariat activity. This activity was responsible for reviewing the way government departments and agencies carry out regulatory responsibilities in order to reduce barriers to economic growth. This review process was completed within the same fiscal year. The Division Review Secretariat also operated between 1998-2000, and provided support and advice to Cabinet and acted as a liaison between the GNWT and the Government of Nunavut. After division of the Northwest Territories and the creation of Nunavut, this unit ceased to exist. In 1999-2000, the Personnel Secretariat Unit was renamed Corporate Human Resource Services. This unit continued to develop and monitor the government's recruitment policy, Affirmative Action Policy and other government-wide human resource policies, as well as provide training and advice to GNWT departments on staff development and human resource planning. Furthermore, the services delivered by the Official Languages Unit were transferred to the Department of Education, Culture and Employment in 1999. Between 2000-2001, three new units were added to the Cabinet Secretariat; Communications, Regional Relations and Intergovernmental Forum Secretariat. The Communications Unit develops, produces and distributes Department of Executive publications, provides advice and implements public affairs strategies to the Premier, Executive Council and Departments and provides protocol services to the GNWT. In addition, this unit communities the goals, strategies and agenda of the GNWT within government and to the public. The Regional Relations Unit is responsible for enhancing communications within and between regions and Headquarters. It also assists regions in preparation for transfer of government programs and services through capacity building and aboriginal self-government. This unit ceased to exist in 2002-2003. The Intergovernmental Forum Secretariat is responsible for coordinating the Government’s participation in Aboriginal, Territorial and Federal government discussions on issues such as devolution, resource revenue sharing, oil and gas developments, and fiscal relationship with Ottawa and northern control over northern resources. In 2002-2003, the Intergovernmental Forum Secretariat and the Intergovernmental Affairs Unit joined to form the Intergovernmental Relations and Strategic Planning Unit. The Energy Secretariat was added to the Cabinet Secretariat in 2002-2003. It was responsible for coordinating the development of an NWT Energy Strategy within the GNWT. Once this unit completed its task and ceased to exist in 2003-2004. The Corporate Review and Transition Planning Project was added to the Cabinet Secretariat in 2003-2004; it conducted an examination of GNWT functions and structure in order to report on future issues and actions for consideration by the Executive Council.

The Public Utilities Board is an independent regulatory agency responsible for the regulation of the energy utilities in the NWT. The Board derives its authority from the Public Utilities Act.

The Financial Management Board Secretariat (FMBS) was expanded and transferred from the Department of Finance to the Department of Executive. With the exception of staffing and external financial responsibilities, the Financial Management Board Secretariat has assumed all human resource and financial management functions of the Department of Personnel and Finance. FMBS provides centralized revenue and general accounting, comptrollership, program and organizational design services, internal audit, program evaluation, pay and benefit services, human resources planning and development as well as labour relations services to the Government of the Northwest Territories. These services are provided through four core business units: Directorate, Human Resources, Government Accounting and Audit, Budgeting and Evaluation. Between 1998-99, these core units changed to the Directorate, Labour Relations and Compensation Services, Government Accounting, the Audit Bureau and Budgeting and Evaluation. In 2003-2004, the Office of the Chief Information Officer was created and reported to the Secretary of the Financial Management Board/Comptroller General. This Office was responsible for developing a strategy for the management and utilization of the GNWT’s information resources, as well as coordinates an information management/information systems/information technology planning process that span multiple departments as well as provide advice and support to the Informatics Policy Committee.

The Ministry of Intergovernmental and Aboriginal Affairs serves the Minister Responsible for Aboriginal Affairs and the Cabinet Committee System. The Ministry manages and coordinates GNWT participation at land claims, self-government and treaty negotiations and monitors Western constitutional development. The three areas of program support included the Directorate, Policy and Implementation and Negotiations. Between 2001-2002, the Policy and Implementation Division separated to form their own separate divisions. The Implementation Division became solely responsible for the negotiation of implementation plans and managing and monitoring the implementation of settled lands, resources and self-government agreements. In 2002-2003, a new unit was added to the Ministry. The Intergovernmental Forum Secretariat is responsible for GNWT coordination in Aboriginal, territorial and federal government discussions on pan-territorial issues such as economic development, capacity building and financing governments. The Ministry also works to enhance communications with regions and between regions and Headquarters and to work with regions to prepare for changes to the delivery of government programs and services in advance of new governance arrangements being negotiated. A sixth functional unit was added to the Ministry of Aboriginal Affairs in 2003-2004 with the Devolution Division. This division is responsible for managing GNWT participation and representing the GNWT interest in the negotiations of devolution and resource revenue sharing agreements. The Department of Aboriginal Affairs and Intergovernmental Relations (DAAIR) formed in 2006-2007 when the Department of Aboriginal Affairs gained the intergovernmental relations function from the Department of Executive. The Department of Aboriginal Affairs had also been responsible for devolution and resource revenue functions, however with the formation of the DAAIR, these functions remained with the Executive.

Northwest Territories. Ministry of Aboriginal Affairs

  • Corporate body

The Ministry of Aboriginal Affairs, created in 1995, was a central agency that supported the Minister Responsible for Aboriginal Affairs and the Executive Council. The Ministry managed and coordinated the participation of the Government of the Northwest Territories in all lands, resources and self-government negotiations. It was also responsible for negotiating and developing implementation plans and providing strategic advice on the Aboriginal and Intergovernmental Relations of the Northwest Territories. Advice on national and territorial Aboriginal relations was also provided. There were five divisions within the Ministry. In addition to internal management responsibilities, the Directorate provided strategic advice and support to the Minister and Executive Council on political and constitutional development and on relations with Aboriginal leaders and organizations both within the Northwest Territories and nationally. The prime functions of the Negotiations Division were to manage the GNWT participation and to represent the GNWT interest in the negotiation of lands, resources and self-government agreements. The Policy & Communications Division developed public and internal policies and legislative proposals for the Ministry, provided advice to the Minister and Deputy Minister and developed instructions and mandates for the GNWT's participation in negotiation agreements and implementation plans. This Division also provided support to GNWT negotiators, participated in central agency reviews of legislative proposals and was responsible for overall Ministry communications. The Implementation Division negotiated implementation plans and managed and monitored the implementation of settled lands, resources and self-government agreements. The prime function of the Devolution Negotiations Division was the negotiation of Devolution and Resource Revenue Sharing Agreements with the Federal Government and the Aboriginal Summit. The Devolution Division led the Government of the Northwest Territories’ (GNWT) participation in these negotiations, coordinating the input from other Departments and the preparation of negotiating instructions.

Northwest Territories. Department of Aboriginal Affairs and Intergovernmental Relations. Intergovernmental Relations division

  • Corporate body

The Intergovernmental Relations Division ensured the interests and aspirations of the residents of the NWT are reflected in the GNWT participation in intergovernmental activities. This division is responsible for managing the Government’s relationships with federal, provincial and territorial governments and with circumpolar countries in all matters of intergovernmental significance. It provides strategic advice on matters pertaining to federal-provincial-territorial relations and in domestic matters that have intergovernmental or government-wide implications. Participation ranged from involvement in national initiatives and policy development, to initiating and developing cross-departmental strategies, to shaping strategies led by other GNWT departments.

Northwest Territories. Department of Aboriginal Affairs and Intergovernmental Relations (2006-2017)

  • Corporate body
  • 2006-2017

The Department of Aboriginal Affairs and Intergovernmental Relations (DAAIR) formed in 2006-2007 when the Department of Aboriginal Affairs gained the intergovernmental relations function from the Department of Executive. The Department of Aboriginal Affairs had also been responsible for devolution and resource revenue functions, however with the formation of the DAAIR, these functions remained with the Executive.

The Department of Aboriginal Affairs and Intergovernmental Relations was the central agency that supported the Minister Responsible for Aboriginal Affairs and Intergovernmental Relations. The Department managed and coordinated the participation of the GNWT in all land, resource and self-government negotiations. It was also responsible for negotiating and developing implementation plans and providing strategic advice on Aboriginal and Intergovernmental Relations in the NWT, Canada and internationally.

The Department consisted of five divisions: the Directorate Division, Negotiations Division, Implementation Division, Intergovernmental Relations Division and Policy, Legislation and Communications Division. The Directorate Division managed the internal operations of the Department. It was responsible for providing strategic advice and support to the Minister and the Department. In addition to internal management responsibilities, the Directorate provided strategic advice and support to the Minister and the Department on political and constitutional development, and on Intergovernmental relations with Aboriginal leaders and organizations territorially, nationally and internationally. It also coordinated the financial and business planning for the Department. The Directorate helped to support Aboriginal organizations through and grants and contributions program that provides core funding to Métis Locals, funding to Aboriginal organizations for special events such as Aboriginal Day, and funding to municipalities to allow for planning and participation in self-government negotiations.

The Negotiations Division participated in land, resource and self-government negotiations, as well as treaty land entitlement negotiations that were active within the NWT. It was responsible for representing the interests of the GNWT at each table, as well as the interests of all NWT residents. In self-government negotiations, territorial jurisdiction or law-making authorities and the programs and services are under negotiation. New systems of governance emerged into the northern political landscape as agreements were finalized and implemented. There were new regional and community systems of governance, some representing a combination of Aboriginal and public governments, while others the creation of Aboriginal government only. As of 2007-2008, there were five Aboriginal organizations negotiating self-government agreements with Canada and the GNWT: the Gwich’in Tribal Council; the Inuvialuit Regional Corporation; the Deline First Nation; Tulita Yamoria Secretariat; and the Norman Wells Land Corporation. All five groups reached a final land claims agreement.

The Implementation Division was responsible for negotiating implementation plans, and managing and monitoring the implementation of settled land, resource and self-government agreements. The process for negotiating or developing an implementation plan varied depending on the particular interests of the three parties at the negotiation table. Terms of reference are usually developed first to guide the start up of an implementation working group. The working group consists of representatives from the GNWT, Federal government and Aboriginal claimant group and is responsible for identifying all activities and obligations flowing from the agreement-in-principle. After a final agreement and other corollary agreements, including the implementation plan, received Royal Assent in the House of Commons, a formal Implementation Committee is established to oversee, direct and monitor ongoing implementation of the agreement. This committee is comprised of representatives form the GNWT, Canada and Aboriginal claimant group. The Committee is also responsible for reviewing or amending the implementation plan as required. As for 2007-2008, there are three implementation plans being carried out in the NWT: Gwich’in Implementation Plan, Sahtu Implementation Plan and Tlicho Implementation plan. Implementation plans are being negotiated at Deline self-government. Progress reports are published to keep beneficiaries and the public informed. The implementation committee produces annual reports and other information items to report on the status of each plan.

The Intergovernmental Relations Division ensured the interests and aspirations of the residents of the NWT are reflected in the GNWT participation in intergovernmental activities. This division is responsible for managing the Government’s relationships with federal, provincial and territorial governments and with circumpolar countries in all matters of intergovernmental significance. It provides strategic advice on matters pertaining to federal-provincial-territorial relations and in domestic matters that have intergovernmental or government-wide implications. Participation ranged from involvement in national initiatives and policy development, to initiating and developing cross-departmental strategies, to shaping strategies led by other GNWT departments.

The Policy, Legislation and Communications Division developed public and internal policies and legislative proposals for the Department. The division also provides advice to the Minister and Deputy Minister, and developed instructions and mandates for the GNWT’s participation in negotiating land, resource and self-government agreements and implementation plans. This division also provides support to GNWT negotiators, participates in central agency review of legislative proposals and is responsible for the overall Department communications. The Policy and Legislation section of this division developed frameworks (instructions and mandates) for the GNWT in the negotiation of Aboriginal land, resource and self-government agreements and associated implementation plans. Frameworks are based on directions and interests of the GNWT, research and comparative analysis of existing, emerging and settled Aboriginal land, resource and self-government agreements. The Policy section also provided support to the Negotiations and Implementation Divisions during negotiation of agreements, development and negotiation of associated implementation plans, and agreement implementation. The Policy section develops legislation arising from GNWT commitments made in the negotiation of land, resource and self-government agreements. The section was also responsible for maintaining current public and internal policy statements of the Department. Advice, information and assistance is provided to the Minister and Deputy Minister, which includes briefings related to the Legislative Assembly and meetings with federal, provincial and territorial governments, Aboriginal leaders an organizations and for other meetings the Minister or Deputy Minister may attend. The Policy and Legislation Section provides support to the Deputy Ministers’ Committee on Aboriginal Rights, which is chaired by the Deputy Minister of DAAIR. It also participates in the Legislative Initiatives Committee’s review of all legislative initiatives from all GNWT departments. The Communications section was responsible for the Department’s overall communication efforts. It developed, recommended and implemented communication projects, strategies, frameworks and systems within the Department. It also contributed to the fulfillment of GNWT communication and consultation obligations that arise from land, resource and self-government negotiations, implementation negotiations and finalized agreements.

On April 1, 2017, the Department of Aboriginal Affairs and Intergovernmental Relations merged with the Department of the Executive to form the Department of the Executive and Indigenous Affairs (EIA).

Northwest Territories. Department of Aboriginal Affairs and Intergovernmental Relations. Directorate

  • Corporate body

The Directorate Division managed the internal operations of the Department. It was responsible for providing strategic advice and support to the Minister and the Department. In addition to internal management responsibilities, the Directorate provided strategic advice and support to the Minister and the Department on political and constitutional development, and on Intergovernmental relations with Aboriginal leaders and organizations territorially, nationally and internationally. It also coordinated the financial and business planning for the Department. The Directorate helped to support Aboriginal organizations through and grants and contributions program that provides core funding to Métis Locals, funding to Aboriginal organizations for special events such as Aboriginal Day, and funding to municipalities to allow for planning and participation in self-government negotiations.

Canada. Department of the Interior

  • Corporate body

The federal Department of the Interior was established on May 3, 1873, absorbing some of the functions of the former Department of the Secretary of State for the Provinces. The department was established to administer and develop the newly acquired territories in the West. It included a Surveys Branch, which was responsible for surveying and mapping and in 1922 a Northwest Territories and Yukon Branch was organized to administer the northern territories. The Surveys Branch was renamed the Technical Branch in 1883, and in 1890 the Topographical Surveys Branch. On June 23, 1936, the Department of the Interior amalgamated with the Department of Mines and the Department of Immigration and Colonization to form a new Department of Mines and Resources.

Slipchenko, Walter

  • Person
  • 1934-2016

Walter Slipchenko was born in Winnipeg in 1934 to Ivan and Olga Slipchenko. After being raised in Winnipeg, he furthered his education at the Canadian Military College at Royal Roads, Victoria, British Columbia and Royal Military College, Kingston, Ontario, becoming an officer in the Royal Canadian Engineers. He later left the military, completing a Masters of Arts at the University of Manitoba in 1966. He then joined the federal civil service, being employed by the Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development (DIAND) from 1966 to 1988, in their Northern Coordination Research Group and Northern Science Research Group. In 1971, Walter was part of the Jean Chretien (Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development) delegation to the USSR. Several agreements came out of this visit and succeeding visits, while Walter was secretary and coordinator of the Canada-USSR Arctic Sciences Programme. Finally, Walter founded the Circumpolar Affairs Division of DIAND, becoming its Chief. From the mid-1970s to mid-1980s, Walter also lectured at Carleton University in the Geography Department, held positions on several advisory boards, and researched the socio-economic and technical development of the northern USSR. From 1988 to 1992, Walter served in the GNWT as Director of Circumpolar Affairs. While he was in this role, the GNWT signed two international agreements of note: “A Programme of Cooperation” with the Home Rule Government of Greenland and a “Memorandum of Understanding” with the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia) in support of a joint venture to build a $26 million village. In 1991, Walter was honoured for his work, receiving the Gold Medal Award from the Professional Institute of the Public Service of Canada. Walter also assisted in the creation of the Canadian office of the Inuit Circumpolar Conference, brought indigenous Russian participation in the Arctic Winter Games, and aided in the institution of several cooperative arrangements between circumpolar countries. From 1992 to 2000, Walter worked as a consultant, becoming involved with the establishment of the Arctic Council, the Northern Management Project for the Government of Sakha (Yakutia) and the Institution Building for Northern Russian Indigenous Peoples’ Project. In 1997-98, he was Executive Director of the Arctic Council Secretariat and in 1998-99, chaired the Advisory Committee on the Humanitarian Assistance Project to Northern Russia, Phase I. Walter was married to Olga Sheremeta and the couple had one son, Andrew. Walter Slipchenko passed away in July 2016, at the age of 82.

Dene Nation

  • Corporate body

Concerns over the written terms of Treaties 8 and 11 prompted the formation of the Indian Brotherhood of the Northwest Territories. Incorporated to represent the Dene people of the Northwest Territories in 1970, it changed its name to Dene Nation in 1978. In July 1975, the Second Dene Assembly, a representative assembly of Dene from all communities in the Mackenzie Valley, adopted the "Dene Declaration" at Fort Simpson. Beyond its work in negotiating land claims, the Dene Nation also oversees programs regarding Dene land and resource development, legal issues, health, community development and education.