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[Loe, Ole]
N-2022-003: D1-3-0013 · Item · 2017
Part of W. D. Addison Nahanni collection

The document consists of the completed "Ole Loe Interview" by William D. (Bill) Addison and Index by Wendy E. Addison, dated February 2017. The booklet includes an introduction, general remarks, description of methods, portrait of Loe, an introduction to Loe, chronology, the interview transcript, and an index.

N-2022-003: 0456 · Item · 1935
Part of W. D. Addison Nahanni collection

Bill Clark's Written Caption on Back of Photo: "CF-AWR Photo taken at Glacier or Brintnell Lake, S. Nahanni area, 100 miles above Virginia Falls in 1935. This is one of the huge single engine Bellanca planes left as only a few were built. Cathedral Mountain in background. Stan Macmillan pilot. (for Mackenzie Air Service) Wm (Bill) Clark"

Photographer: unknown

WDA's Comments: This photo was taken by someone on Harry Snyder's 1935 expedition to the South Nahanni country but how Bill Clark obtained this copy is unknown. Judging from this photo and several interviews, Snyder had to have the biggest and best of everything. He thought himself sufficiently important that he unsuccessfully attempted to get today's Ragged Range named the Snyder Mountains. Thankfully, he failed. (I know, I am not supposed to editorialize but sometimes I can't help myself.)

[Hansen, Charlie]
N-2022-003: D1-3-0008 · Item · 2013
Part of W. D. Addison Nahanni collection

The document consists of the completed "Charlie Hansen Interview" by William D. (Bill) Addison, dated December 2013. The booklet includes acknowledgements, introduction, general remarks, description of methods, a portrait of Hansen, an introduction to Hansen, chronology, and the interview transcript.

Please note that this interview contains an outdated and derogatory term historically used to refer to persons of Chinese ancestry.

N-2022-003: 0711 · Item · 1941
Part of W. D. Addison Nahanni collection

Caption on back of photo: "#17. 1941 Priming the pump for the morning workout in draining hole beneath falls. Took a ½ hour - 3 " outlet. Sluice box built inside flume has a manual opening and closing device. We built it with B. C. fir in 12 foot long sections tapered to fit each other. Bill Clark"

Caption Source: Bill Clark

Photographer: Carl Falcon, print from copy negative

WDA's Comments, 2013 Jul 10: The long arduous work of emptying the pothole beneath the flume began by pumping the water down to a level where they could begin scooping gravel out from between large boulders which occupied much of the hole. Some water constantly seeped in and had to be pumped out so they could continue working. The large boulders could neither be lifted out nor blasted out (wreck the flume), so they had to wedge the boulders in place with logs before wiggling down between them to get lower. Bill Clark's small size was a decided advantage in this dangerous chore. Meanwhile freezing conditions arrived before the hole was completely cleaned out. It must have been wet, very cold, unpleasant work. The first chore each morning was to pump out the water that had accumulated overnight. The hole was completely emptied before Oct 13 when Falcon radioed out, "Completed our big job the result is nil." In his Interview Falcon states that hey did not get even one colour of gold. What a crushing disappointment.

N-2022-003: 0620 · Item · [ca. 1936 or 1937]
Part of W. D. Addison Nahanni collection

Caption Source: Bill Cormack interview and Bill Addison

Photographer: unknown but likely G.C.F. Dalziel

WDA's Comments, 2013 Oct. 12: G. C. F. Dalziel (Dal) pioneered a trapping method that only Bill Cormack, Nazar Zinchuk and a few others were able to emulate. They were normally out on the traplines sleeping in half a Hudson's Bay blanket with a light tarp under and over them even at -50 °F. Their ability to tolerate such condition meant they had little gear to carry and therefore they could travel great distances and trap a huge area, quickly skimming off the easy-to-trap marten, As soon as catches dropped off slightly, they moved on. Their system required paring everything to an absolute minimum. Note the similarity of this main camp to Dalziel's in a previous photo. The tent was only used occasionally

Bill Cormack identifies this camp as at Porcupine Lake in his interview but I do not know where the lake is. I could find no such named lake either in the South Nahanni watershed or in its vicinity on topographic maps or in the NWT Gazetteer. It is one of several lakes along the YT-NT boundary in prime marten trapping territory.

N-2022-003: 0548 · Item · [ca. 1945-46]
Part of W. D. Addison Nahanni collection

Bill Clark's Caption on back of photo: "Winter of 1943. Japanese balloon shot down near Ft. Simpson airport and draped around spruce tree. Balloon is 63 ft by 33 ft with many ¼" ropes. Balloon composed of thin laminated paper-light green color and impossible to tear when wet. Bill Clark"

Photographer: unknown

WDA's Comments: Bill's caption contains erroneous information. The Japanese navy released a total of 9300 incendiary or explosive balloons, the first on 1944 Nov 03 and the last on 1945 Apr (Wikipedia). According to Milt Campbell who witnessed the balloon drifting in, it just snagged in the trees and was not shot down. Milt places the landing date as 1946 Feb. It is certainly a more plausible date than Bill Clark's, although if that is the case it was among the very last balloons released and it took 10 months to reach Fort Simpson. That is a long time given the rate at which winds move across the Pacific. A more reasonable landing date would seem to be 1945 Feb. The date for this photo needs corroboration.

N-2022-003: 0388 · Item · June 1930
Part of W. D. Addison Nahanni collection

Bill Clark's Written Caption on back of photo: "Held up by high water June 1930 at head of 1st Canyon, South Nahanni. at George's Riffle just .below island; - Standing, Jack Mulholland & from left to right. Carl Arhus, Jim Macauley [sic] & Bill Epler. Bill and Jack's brother disappeared about 5 yrs later in Glacier Lake area. No clues after ground, river and water search was made. I was on ground & river searches. Bill Clark"

Photographer: presumably Bill Clark

WDA's Comments: This upriver trip was bringing in supplies to establish a big game hunting cabin in Deadmen Valley. They never did reach Deadmen Valley on this trip. Their concept was for a big game hunting resort at Nahanni Hotsprings (Kraus Hotsprings today) with a hunting cabin or cabins in Deadmen Valley The whole McCauley-Clark plan for the resort never came to fruition because the NWT Commissioner's office failed to grant them the necessary lease (see Clark Papers and interview).

Note that Clark misspelled McCauley's name in the caption above. Correspondence with NWT Commissioner's office has his name as J. H. McCauley (Clark Papers)

N-2022-003: 1404 · Item · 1927, 1951
Part of W. D. Addison Nahanni collection

[Copy negative of a page from R.M. Patterson's photo album showing 6 images from his 1951 and other trips. Captions on the page:] [Top] Roche qui trempe à l'eau. Fort Nelson River. [Bottom left] Curtis. E.V. sounding. [Bottom middle] Oct. 1927 Old times at the Sikanni Crossing. Techàhnehta. The Sikanni Chief. Corporal Barber. Archie Gardiner. Bellyfull. [Bottom right] Changing propellers. Fort Nelson River.

N-2022-003: 1461 · Item · [ca. 1937]
Part of W. D. Addison Nahanni collection

Caption by Dick Turner: "# 37:Hudson's Bay Company paddle wheeler "Distributor", one of the means used in years past for transporting goods in the North."

Caption Source: Dick Turner but it was probably supplied by Kay or Stanley Turner. It was typed on yellow paper pasted on the back of the photo by Dick Turner.

Photographer: unknown but probably Kay or Stan Turner

WDA's Comments, 2014 May 23: This is one of nine photos by Kay or Stanley Turner that appear in Dick Turner's book Nahanni. Each photo has a caption typed on yellow paper pasted on the back of the photo and plus publisher's notes written on the back of the photo. The typed captions on yellow paper appear to be Dick's ... The Distributor hauled freight and people between Fort Smith and Aklavik on the Slave and Mackenzie Rivers.

N-2022-003: 0617 · Item · [March or April 1936]
Part of W. D. Addison Nahanni collection

Caption Source: Bill Cormack interview and Bill Addison

Photographer: Bill Cormack but likely on Dal's camera

WDA's Comments, 2013 Oct. 14: If this is their complete marten catch there are 212 marten here according to Bill Cormack in his interview. More likely this is the pile of 100 marten seen in the previous photo. This tent was their headquarters. It had a small light-weight 'tin' (steel) stove. Bill and Dal rarely slept here. They were normally out on the traplines sleeping in half a Hudson's Bay blanket with a light tarp under and over them even at -50 °F. Their ability to tolerate such condition meant they had little gear to carry and therefore they could travel great distances and trap a huge area, quickly skimming the easy to trap marten, As soon as catches dropped off they moved on. Maximum efficiency was the game.

N-2022-003: 1460 · Item · 1937
Part of W. D. Addison Nahanni collection

Caption by: probably Kay or Stanley Turner but it was typed on yellow paper on back by Dick Turner after consulting Kay or Stan as to its whereabouts and date. Dick's caption is "#8: Paddle Wheeler "Athabasca River" on the Slave River in 1937."

Caption Source: see above

Photographer: likely Kay or Stanley Turner. Dick Turner was not along on this trip.

WDA's Comments, 2014 May 23: This is one of nine photos by Kay or Stanley Turner that appear in Dick Turner's book Nahanni. Each photo has a caption typed on yellow paper pasted on the back of the photo plus publisher's notes written on the back of the photo. The typed captions on yellow paper appear to be Dick's ... The photo above was taken on Kay and Stanley Turner's trip from Alberta to Fort Simpson in 1937 down the Athabasca, Slave and Mackenzie Rivers. This boat hauled freight and people between Athabasca Landing and Fitzgerald on these rivers.

N-2022-003: 0609 · Item · January, 1936
Part of W. D. Addison Nahanni collection

Caption Source: Bill Cormack interview and Bill Addison

Photographer: G. C. F. Dalziel or Bill Cormack

WDA's Comments, 2013 Oct. 13: This photo was likely taken early January, 1936 by either Dalziel or Bill Cormack on Dal's camera, The left hand building is Poole Field's cabin and the centre one may be Diamond C's. Dal is flying Bill Cormack into what Bill calls Flat Lake, local name, which may be one of the Skinboat Lakes or a nearby lake. They stayed at Nahani Butte for a day or two waiting for it to warm up from a temperature of about -60 °F.

N-2022-003: 0882 · Item · [ca. 1950]
Part of W. D. Addison Nahanni collection

Charlie's photo description: That's where the end of the road was on the island. You can see
the tarp on the Cat D4. That was so I could close off the whole front with a heavy thirty-two
ounce canvas and felt. It had a zipper on it. l rode that Cat all night once on the airport packing
snow. Got to town seven o'clock in the morning. When I got off I couldn't stretch my legs up. I
was like I was still sitting. Then I started to shiver. I stopped in front of the radio station and
that's as far as I could make it. I went in and the cook was up. I got behind the stove and I
shivered for hours. They had measured that night seventy-seven below but that's as far as they
could measure and if it was below they wouldn't say. So it was a cold night.
Caption Source: Charlie Hansen interview.
Photographer: likely Isidore Villeneuve judging from blurred edges
WDA's Comments, 2014 Feb 12: -77 °F = -60.6 °C. The coldest temperature at Fort Simpson
airport for the period 1963-2013 was -47 °C. There may have been colder temperatures before
that. Alternately, Charlie's memory may have failed him.
The caboose had a stove in it and offered basic shelter and heat if away overnight or in a storm.
The fuel may be for logging operations as seen in Photos 110-112 or it may be for an entirely
different purpose.

N-2022-003: 0649 · Item · 1941
Part of W. D. Addison Nahanni collection

Caption on back of photo: "#42 - 1941 - Jean doing his daily dozen at our cabin which was ¾ mile downstream from the canyon. Bill Clark"

Caption Source: Bill Clark

Photographer: Carl Falcon

WDA's Comments, 2013 Jul 10: Bill Clark has misplaced this photo. It is on Carl Falcon's Roll 1 indicating that it was taken shortly after they arrived and not in the fall as the caption suggests.

[Al Wright slides]
N-2022-003: 1554 · Item · 1966
Part of W. D. Addison Nahanni collection

... the Norvan Explorations camp at Prairie Creek. It wasn't Cadillac Exploration yet. Slide 69 is a little closer look at it. It was all tent frames. [Part of Al Wright's and Ernie Birkbeck's journey to deliver two Cat bulldozers to the Norvan Exploration camp at the Prairie Creek lead-silver deposit.]

N-2022-003 · Accession · 1821, 1834, [ca. 1895]-2017

This accession consists of W.D. Addison's collection of material related to the Nahanni area, including his own photographs, trip journals, and maps, the annotated bibliography and literature review he compiled, oral-history interviews he conducted, transcripts and catalogues he compiled and edited, photographs, documents, and maps he gathered from various sources, and correspondence he conducted with Nahanni old-timers and others.

Addison, W.D.
N-2022-003: 0446 · Item · Spring 1935
Part of W. D. Addison Nahanni collection

Bill Clark's Oral Caption from His 1977 Interview: [l-r] Milt Campbell, Gus Kraus, Harry Vandale and John the Russian at frozen waterfall between the mouth of McLeod Creek and Irvine Creek [on the Flat River]. Spring 1935

Photographer: either Bill Clark (most likely) or Albert Faille using Milt Campbell's camera

WDA's Comments: Bill Clark mixed up Gus Kraus and Harry Vandale in his naming here . The actual l→r sequence is Milt Campbell, Harry Vandale, Gus Kraus and John the Russian. Also, John the Russian was not met up with until the mouth of Caribou River where he and Nazar had spent the winter trapping. The person labelled John the Russian may be Bill Clark and that would account for the fifth person travelling in the group from Bennett Creek down to Faille's cabin on Flat River just above Irvine Creek.

John the Russian's surname is unknown to me. Nazar Zinchuk pronounced it for me in his interview, but Nazar did not know how it was spelled. My phonetic transcription of Nazar's pronunciation is Nawoomo but that certainly does not sound like a Russian name. John died near Fort Liard in the fall of 1935 after tipping his canoe while trying to retrieve a moose he'd shot across the river. John made it to shore swimming between ice floes and back to his cabin where he died in bed. He left an explanatory note for Nazar.

N-2022-003: 1258 · Item · [1931 or 1932]
Part of W. D. Addison Nahanni collection

Duncan's photo description: "Red Wolstenholme" (caption on back of photo)
Caption Source: Duncan C. Martin
Photographer: likely Duncan C. Martin
WDA's Comments, 2014 Apr 20: Red Wolstenholme had been cook at the RCMP barracks for some years when he was replaced by Charlie Hansen in late 1932. Red seems to have been quite a character. Charlie describes one of his exploits in which the whole barracks was on a drunk on the arrival of the first boat with the annual liquor permits. Red locked a very drunk constable into the only cell. The next morning Red forgot he'd done this and everyone was frantically looking for the key as the Distributor was blowing its whistle to leave. The constable was supposed to be leaving with Inspector Martin for a downriver posting. Fortunately Red suddenly remembered the key and the constable was delivered to the boat in rather sad shape.

Photographs
N-2022-003-S01-SS05 · Subseries · 1974-1977
Part of W. D. Addison Nahanni collection

This sub-series consists of photographs W.D. Addison took of the Nahanni old-timers he interviewed and associated photographs taken on trips taken to reach them. Locations include Sacramento (California), Brentwood Bay and Saltspring Island (British Columbia), Calgary, Sundre, and Edmonton (Alberta), Enterprise, Hay River, Kakisa, Yellowknife, Fort Simpson, the Liard Valley, and Cantung (Northwest Territories).

N-2022-003: 0553 · Item · [ca. 1945-46]
Part of W. D. Addison Nahanni collection

Bill Clark's Caption on Back of Photo: "Explosive, fuzes & thermal powder from Jap balloon. Ft. Simpson 1942 Wm Clark"

Photographer: unknown

WDA's Comments: The fire balloons had a series of thermal devices that would ignite. The Japanese hoped they would start fires in populated areas or forest fires. The weight of the thermal device was balanced by a counterweight on the opposite side of a circular ring keeping the incendiary-carrying structure horizontal so that incendiary devices could drop away from the balloon freely without tangling in any of the mechanism. Periodically a thermal device and its opposite counterweight were released as the balloon travelled on the wind, the idea being that a string of fires would be started. Some balloons released explosives instead of incendiary bomblets.

Again Bill's date is wrong and the balloon was not shot down. Bill is inflating his own importance in this event. Milt Campbell's account of events seems more reliable (see his interview).