Glick, Harold

Identity area

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Glick, Harold

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Dates of existence

1925-2009

History

Harold Glick was born in 1925 in Sudbury, Ontario to Jacob Isaac (J.I.) Glick and Sadie Glick. He described his upbringing as not overly religious, but his parents did keep a kosher household. He was raised in Sudbury until 1938 or 1939, at which point the family relocated to Montreal. He completed schooling through Grade 10 as well as two years of an electronics apprenticeship through Ecole Polytechnique, after which he worked for Northern Electric Company (1944).

He served in the Second World War in the Royal Canadian Corps of Signals (1944), and upon discharge moved to Yellowknife to be near his parents. He arrived via plane in March 1946 during Operation Muskox, and worked at his parents’ business, the Veterans Cafe, for about a year. For three months in 1947 he worked as an electronics helper at Giant Mine, and then went to Toronto to study radio technologies. In October 1948 he returned to Yellowknife and went into business, starting Yellowknife Radio and Record Store Ltd (YK Radio) in a wall tent next door to the Gold Range Hotel. The store initially sold records, radios, and appliances, and also offered repair services, and by 1952 had moved into a new building. In 1958 an addition was added to the shop. The store’s offerings expanded to include jewellery and furniture. As of 1968-1970, the company had three directors: Harold Glick, Zelda Glick, and Jacob Isaac Glick.

In 1952, Harold Glick married Zelda Vinsky of Vegreville, Alberta, who he had met in Edmonton. Harold and Zelda had four children (Murray, Jeffrey, Leah, and Marilyn), who they sought to raise with a Jewish education. Zelda kept a kosher household in Yellowknife, and brought meat from Winnipeg and Edmonton. The family belonged to Beth Israel Synagogue, a Modern Orthodox synagogue in Edmonton, Alberta. Harold and Zelda sent their sons to Pine Lake (a B’nai B’rith Camp near Red Deer, Alberta) and their daughters to Camp Hatikvah (Lake Kalamalka at Oyama, near Kelowna, British Columbia).

Harold volunteered with Yellowknife's first radio station, and also served on the Yellowknife municipal council (Town Council) during the 1960s, including 1960-1961. He became a director of Hidden Lake Gold Mines Ltd., which was established in 1968.

In 1986, Yellowknife Radio was sold to Roy Williams, and Harold and Zelda Glick moved to Kelowna, British Columbia, where there was both a Yellowknifer community and a Jewish community. Harold passed on April 20, 2009, in British Columbia.

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Related entity

Glick, Jacob Isaac (1899-1973)

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family

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Glick, Jacob Isaac

is the parent of

Glick, Harold

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Draft

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Dates of creation, revision and deletion

May 2022 RS

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Sources

[Interview with Harold Glick]. NWT Archives/Yellowknife Public Library Oral History Project/N-2003-014: 0006A. https://gnwt.accesstomemory.org/n-2003-014-0006a

[Interview with Harold Glick]. NWT Archives/Yellowknife Public Library Oral History Project/N-2003-014: 0006B. https://gnwt.accesstomemory.org/n-2003-014-0006b

Local History File – Harold Glick. NWT Archives/Yellowknife Public Library Oral History Project/N-2003-014: 1-4. https://gnwt.accesstomemory.org/n-2003-014-1-4

Moll, Marianne and Leah Glick. “Yellowknife’s ‘community’: Jewish identity is maintained.” The Canadian Jewish News, January 29, 1981, p 11. https://newspapers.lib.sfu.ca/cjn2-29527/page-11

The Weekender, June 20, 1986, p 6.

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